Book Reviews, Misc, Quickshot

Quickshots #8

Inside Out: Egyptian Mummy by Lorraine Jean Hopping

Dig deep to find the truth of the ancient Egyptians!

Through pictures, beautiful illustrations and, in the case of the hardcopy, through a diecast model embedded in the pages, Inside Out: Egyptian Mummy explores one of the most well-known relic types of ancient Egypt. Layer by layer, the parts of a mummy and its inner and outer coffins are laid bare. This particular mummy is of a high priest, Hornedjitaf. Paired with each segment are tons of interesting tidbits of info about materials used and why, Egyptian spirituality, linguistics, and grave gods, among other things.

My cubs and I really enjoyed reading this book. The archaeologist in me adored it! The language is meant for older readers, but the younger ones enjoyed the pictures, and all of them had lots of questions, prompting learning discussions. Overall, a fascinating look at one very special relc of the past, and the perfect book for any kid interested in ancient Egypt, or archaeology in general.

***Many thanks to Netgalley and Quarto Publishing for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

 

 

Inside Out: T-Rex by Dennis Schatz

Take a walk on the wild side with the Tyrant King!

Through pictures, beautiful illustrations and, in the case of the hardcopy, through a diecast model embedded in the pages, Inside Out: T-Rex explores one of the most popular and well-known dinosaurs. Layer by layer, body systems are explored. Paired with each segment are tons of interesting tidbits of info, though the author is straight-up about the fact that not much is truly known about this ‘king’ of the dinosaurs.

Scientists speculate based on bone structure that T-Rex could not run fast, only about 18 miles an hour, and was likely a opportunistic scavenger. Others believe they didn’t need speed for hunting the gigantic herbivores of the time, but that they were pack-hunters. Bones also suggest T-Rex was warm-blooded. I had no idea the bones of cold-blooded animals resemble tree rings because growth is slower during the colder months! Because dinosaurs no longer exist, and we cannot study them directly, scientists use inference based on similarities with birds, and creatures like crocodiles, who ate a comparable diet, as evidenced by tooth shape.

My cubs and I really enjoyed reading this book. The language is meant for older readers, but the younger ones enjoyed the pictures, and all of them had lots of questions, prompting learning discussions. Overall, a fascinating look at T-Rex, and the perfect book for any dino-loving kid!

***Many thanks to Netgalley and Quarto Publishing for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

 

 

Inside Out: Sharks by David George Gordon

Dive deep with the greatest ocean predators!

Through pictures, beautiful illustrations and, in the case of the hardcopy, through a diecast model embedded in the pages, Inside Out: Sharks explores some of the most fearsome creatures to swim our seas. Layer by layer, body systems of the great white are explored. Paired with each segment are tons of interesting tidbits of info about diet, and lifestyle, though the author does tell us little is truly understood about these magnificent, deadly hunters.

Sharks are fascinating beasties. I had never heard the nickname ‘tommy sharks, though ‘White Death’ was a familiar moniker. I had no idea great whites are ‘warm-blooded’ sharks. This is a different concept than the warm-blooded nature of mammals and birds, and it allows the shark to move faster and adapt better than its cold-blooded cousins. And not all sharks need to be constantly prowling just to live. Wobbegongs can chill on the ocean floor for long stretches because they can force water over their gills. Sharks also give us the largest single cell in the form of the whale shark’s football-sized ova.

My cubs and I really enjoyed reading this book. The language is meant for older readers, but the younger ones enjoyed the pictures, and all of them had lots of questions, prompting learning discussions. Overall, a fascinating look at sharks, and the perfect book for any nature-loving kid!

***Many thanks to Netgalley and Quarto Publishing for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

 

 

Inside Out: Human Body by Luann Columbo

Explore the complex wonder that is the human body!

Through pictures, beautiful illustrations and, in the case of the hardcopy, through a diecast model embedded in the pages, Inside Out: Human Body explores on of the most complex biological machines there is. Layer by layer, the body systems of humans are explored. Paired with each segment are tons of interesting tidbits of info about various body systems and organs.

There some humour to this book. There’s a useful section about urine colour and what it means. Beside ‘pink’, it said ‘you ate beets or rhubarb.’ I nearly spit my tea. Too funny. There are little tasks to perform, if you want. Finding your pulse, checking out the most visible arteries and veins (they are under the tongue), and steaming a mirror. The book recalled my forensic anthropology studies, and left me feeling rather nostalgic.

My cubs and I really enjoyed reading this book. The language is meant for older readers, but the younger ones enjoyed the pictures, and all of them had lots of questions, prompting learning discussions. Overall, a fascinating look at the human body, and the perfect book for any science-loving kid!

***Many thanks to Netgalley and Quarto Publishing for providing an egalley in exchange for a fair and honest review.

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